The Ambulance (1990)

At the risk of sounding like an old fuddy-duddy, watching “The Ambulance” made me think ‘they just don’t make ’em like they used to’ a few times. Along with many of director Larry Cohen’s other efforts (like “Q” and “The Stuff”), “The Ambulance” has a compelling, poignant “do it yourself” aesthetic that makes even mundane scenes more loaded than what’s actually happening. It gives the movie a thrilling “anything can happen” vibe that survives throughout, and it’s only in retrospect that you realize that the narrative is actually fairly straightforward and conventional. But it doesn’t matter because this is pure Cohen-esque cinema at its best: It’s like an extended episode of a police procedural that happens to have the always-arresting Eric Roberts in the lead, which gives even our main protagonist a bit of a sleazy, untrustworthy edge that speaks more to Roberts’ own charismatic-but-jerkish-nevertheless appeal. There’s also a series of arresting supporting performances that liven things up (in particular James Earl Jones, who up-ends his character’s stuffy lines with a downright demented energy like he’s playing an early, grizzled version of Andre Braughner’s Captain Holt on “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”), and it’s fascinating to see the early days of Marvel (given that much of the narrative occurs at Marvel headquarters, replete with a Stan Lee cameo), so all in all, this is a terrific, electrifying little B-movie thriller that positively glides through its 96 minute running time.

Rating: ★★★ (out of 5)

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s